The Effect of Autonomy-Supportive Therapeutic Recreation Programming on Integrated Motivation for Treatment among Persons who Abuse Substances
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Jaimie Cogswell, Sandra K. NegleyThe Effect of Autonomy-Supportive Therapeutic Recreation Programming on Integrated Motivation for Treatment among Persons who Abuse Substances

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA, 2009) substance abuse is a major public health concern economically impacting society by 67 billion dollars annually. Effective substance abuse treatment could potentially decrease this amount by reducing crime and increasing the psychological health and physical well-being of many Americans. Studies in substance abuse treatment indicate that client motivation for treatment is directly linked to treatment retention and successful recovery. Programs that are autonomy-supportive and based on Self-Determination Theory have shown greater integrated motivation for treatment. Self-determination is inherent to leisure and leisure based interventions are the essence of Therapeutic Recreation treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of an autonomy-supportive therapeutic recreation program on motivation for treatment and perceived autonomy-supportive environment. Participants took part in one of three research groups or the control group and completed two questionnaires; the Treatment Motivation Questionnaire, measuring integrated motivation for treatment at pre and post treatment phases and the Treatment Climate Questionnaire, measuring perceived autonomy-supportive environment. Although ANCOVA and ANOVA analyses produced nonsignificant statistical results, client feedback supported the use of therapeutic recreation interventions in substance abuse treatment.

Author Jaimie Cogswell, Sandra K. Negley
Volume Vol 45, No 1 (2011)
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