Leisure Needs and Leisure Satisfaction Levels of Adult Males with HIV and AIDS
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Anne Marie Kibler, Ralph W. SmithLeisure Needs and Leisure Satisfaction Levels of Adult Males with HIV and AIDS

This study examined self-reported leisure needs and leisure satisfaction levels of adult males with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Specifically, it sought to (a) determine leisure needs regarding social (interpersonal and community) and stress-releasing activities, (b) examine perceived leisure satisfaction scores for social and stress releasing activities, and (c) compare leisure needs and leisure satisfaction using procedures similar to importance-performance analysis (Martilla & James, 1977). The sample consisted of 60 participants (19 with HIV and 41 with AIDS). Leisure needs and leisure satisfaction scales, based upon two subscales in Beard and Ragheb’s (1980) Leisure Satisfaction Scale, were used to assess leisure-related variables. Need for social interaction was lower than expected; however, participants’ satisfaction levels were generally consistent with their social needs. Need for stress-releasing activities was high. Comparing stress-related needs with satisfaction levels revealed that these high needs are not being satisfied. This finding suggests that intervention strategies (e.g., therapeutic recreation) may be necessary to facilitate meeting high levels of need for stress release.

Author Anne Marie Kibler, Ralph W. Smith
Volume Vol 34, No 2 (2000)
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