Effects of Facilitation Techniques on Challenge Initiative Related Outcomes Among Adolescents Receiving Mental Health Services
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Derek W. Tate, Gary D. EllisEffects of Facilitation Techniques on Challenge Initiative Related Outcomes Among Adolescents Receiving Mental Health Services

This study examined the effects of three facilitation techniques (adaptive, whole, and fixed training) on self-efficacy, self-affirmation, and performance of a challenge initiative among adolescents in mental health facilities. Forty-five adolescents with a variety of clinical diagnoses participated in the study. Research participants were randomly assigned to one of three training groups: adaptive training, fixed training, and whole training. Each group participated in a preintervention test of performance, in which they attempted to maneuver across a 25 foot long balance beam as quickly as possible. After the research participants had completed the preintervention test, they participated in training according to the method to which they were assigned. Following training, participants completed measures of selfefficacy, self-affirmation and a postintervention performance test. Significant self-efficacy differences between the adaptive and whole training groups, and between the fixed and whole training groups, were found using a Mann-Whitney U test. An ANCOVA, followed up with the Bryant-Paulson technique revealed a significant difference on self-affirmation between the adaptive and whole training groups. No significant difference was found in performance across the three groups. Also, no significant difference was found between the adaptive and fixed groups for any of the variables. The sample mean of the adaptive training group, however, was consistently higher than the fixed training group on all dependent variables.

Author Derek W. Tate, Gary D. Ellis
Volume Vol 31, No 2 (1997)
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