Case Histories in Therapeutic Recreation: Research Implications for Practitioners and Educators
Menu

Catherine P. Coyle, Charles C. BullockCase Histories in Therapeutic Recreation: Research Implications for Practitioners and Educators

Case histories have become an important means of communication among many therapeutic recreation (TR) practitioners, a means of sharing clinical information and discussing treatment approaches. Case histories are typically anecdotal reports on the progress/treatment of a specific client. Case histories are not intended to be research evidence, however; they have great potential as a starting point for research which mirrors issues faced by practitioners routinely.

Twelve case histories published in TRJ since 1991 were reviewed to determine common themes. In all of the case histories reviewed, the themes that were presented suggest possible research questions. Although a variety of types of studies can come out of case histories, case studies are recommended as the next step in moving case histories into the research arena since they are easily conducted in clinical practice or field settings. Case studies can be undertaken from either a naturalistic or positivistic paradigm; although, the questions, design, methods, analysis, and presentation differ based upon the paradigm. This type of research is needed today, more than ever, to substantiate the efficacy of therapeutic recreation, to understand the interventions which are used, and to convince administrators and funders as well as to satisfy consumers of TR services.


Author Catherine P. Coyle, Charles C. Bullock
Volume Vol 29, No 4 (1995)
Download PDF